Saudi Arabia: Alcoholism in the Kingdom

alcoholic

steadyhealth.com

 

Alcohol is legally forbidden in the Kingdom and against Islam.  Possession of alcohol or public drunkenness carries strict penalties.  Yet that being said, there are individuals in Saudi Arabia, both Saudis and expatriates, who have alcohol addiction problems.  Expatriates may have had their addiction prior to arrival in the Kingdom and some Saudis may acquired their addiction while outside of the Kingdom.  However, there are also individuals actively battling against an alcohol addiction within the Kingdom.

There are Saudis with WASTA who are able to acquire alcohol.  Foreign Embassies and diplomats have an exemption and are allowed set quantities of alcohol. There are also a number of bootleggers who illegally bring alcohol into the Kingdom’s borders.  These bootleggers believe the high risks, which can include the death penalty, is worth the ultimate gain in profits.  In addition, there is a wide “home brew” market in the Kingdom where others make their own spirits within the privacy of their homes.  Last but not least, many Western compounds which prohibit Saudis from being on the property, will have a bar which will also sell “home brew.”

Alcoholism is a disease and while alcohol is illegal in the Kingdom, treatment for the disease is available.  This is not a topic that is widely discussed and some individuals battling with an alcohol addiction in the Kingdom may not know where to turn for help.

This link  takes one to the web site for Alcoholics Anonymous (AA) in Saudi Arabia.  Meetings take place in the cities of Dhahran and also Al-Khobar (Eastern Province).  In addition there are meetings in Riyadh and Jeddah.

Although the website Alcohol Rehab does not contain factual information in regards to the availability of AA in Saudi Arabia, it does contain good background  information on illegal alcohol in Saudi Arabia and the dangers of “home brew.”

Saudi Arabia: Expatriates Should Not Take Advantage of Sympathy or Generosity

public laundry

valleygirltalk.com

 

There was a recent incident which took place in Jeddah.  A Pakistani couple claim they were accosted by a Saudi couple in a public place of business.  However, all anyone has to go on is the expatriate’s account of the incident.  We all know there are always two sides to every story.

The incident, from what the expatriate couple are stating, seemed to stem from an initial altercation between the Pakistani woman and a Saudi woman.  The altercation intensified and the husband’s became involved.

There have been no accounts from any witnesses of the incident.  Yet the incident as it was relayed evoked shock, outrage and sympathy for the Pakistani couple.  Senior officials from the place of business were made aware of the incident and contacted the Pakistani couple.  A well known English language daily in the Kingdom even carried an article about the incident with an apology to the Pakistani couple.

Yet since the incident has taken place, instead of responding with grace and a positive outlook, the Pakistani woman seems more intent on raising ire with Saudi nationals, expatriates in the Kingdom and her own homeland.

As a result, support and sympathy for the couple is dwindling.  The Pakistani woman even created a specific Facebook Page for further discussions about the incident and demand for change to occur within the Kingdom on Saudis attitudes of expatriates.

American Bedu was part of the Facebook Group but found herself unceremoniously removed from the group when declaring that what the Pakistani woman was now doing and saying was not appropriate.

I can live with being declared persona non grata of a Facebook Group.  But I will restate what I believe was sound advice to the Pakistani woman.  If one is dissatisfied with action or lack thereof from an incident in Saudi Arabia, do not continue to talk badly about your host country.  Even –if- (which is now questionable) she has a valid complaint, she remains a guest in the country.  Both she and her husband are under the sponsorship of a Saudi employer.  Secondly, it is not appropriate to post private correspondence between her and her country’s Consulate in a public Facebook Group.  In addition, although she is not satisfied with the response from the Consulate, she should not mock her country’s role in Saudi Arabia and its relationship with the Kingdom.

Okay, enough of what should not have been done.  Instead she should have filed a report with the manager at the place of business where the incident occurred.  The police should have been called immediately.  Statements should have been collected from witnesses.  She did notify her Consulate.  She did speak with senior officials at the place of business.  However, rather than complain and make a mockery of the positive that took place, she should instead have delivered a comprehensive –and realistic- action plan of what she wanted to see in the way of restitution and resolution.  Details of which should remain between her and the officials involved, rather than share in a “dissing” manner on a public Facebook Page.

It is American Bedu’s assessment based on her own years of experience that the Pakistani woman, more so than her husband, is enjoying her “15 minutes of global fame” and trying to prolong the attention to herself.  Instead of reaching a positive resolution her husband may very well receive unwanted pressure due to his wife’s inappropriate actions.

Wrongs can be righted but it must be done within the parameters of an established procedure.

Saudi Arabia: The Artist, Dorothy Boyer, and Her Masterpieces

 

It is an honor for American Bedu to have this rare opportunity to interview artist Dorothy Boyer.

 najdi-wedding-costumedetail

Dorothy, your works of art are not only beautiful and eye-catching, but very diverse as well.  You have created works of art from watercolors, to exquisite murals and even on furniture! Thank you so much for this opportunity to interview you and ask you questions about yourself, your life and your art!

 

To begin with, please share a little bit about yourselves with American Bedu readers.  What nationality are you?  When did you first become interested in art as a career?  When and where did you study?

Thank you for the opportunity to discuss aspects of my art with your American Bedu readers.

I am Scottish.

I do not remember a moment when I was not interested in art, but not always as a career.

Art was well taught at my girls’ school but I did not go on to art school, studying to be a teacher instead.

However I have always painted, and had the opportunity to study the works of master artists in galleries in Scotland. This is where I learned.

I did however take courses in all aspects of restorative work with furniture, and specialist painting later on in London and also took workshops with master watercolourist Charles Reid and Botanical painter Jenny Jowat.  wall-panel2

When one thinks of Saudi Arabia, one does not typically think of an expat artist in its midst.  When did you first arrive in Saudi Arabia?  What was the first piece of art for which you were commissioned in the Kingdom?

I arrived in February 1992 to paint the walls, and columns in a grand villa, and to carry out mural work for a well known Sheik in Jeddah.

 

Since then, how long have you been in the Kingdom and what type of work are you doing there? 

I have been in Jeddah for 21 years, carrying out all kinds of decorative painting, faux finishes, trompe l’oeil murals, teaching and painting my own watercolours, oils and pastels.

 

In your experience, how interested are Saudis in collecting art?  What type of art works seem to appeal to Saudis?  Watercolors?  Oils?  Murals?

For many years Saudis seemed to be interested in having murals, which historically are designed to show the status of the owner.

Collecting oils has always appealed, as homebuilders have sought to furnish and embellish the interiors of their new and improved homes.

There has always been a market here as far as I can tell, for copies of master works, predominantly from the Far East.

But the more educated and enlightened Saudi has always sought works that are original, frequently by artists from neighbouring lands. Many of these artists have studied outside the Kingdom of course, as art was not given a very important place in the school and college curriculum. 

There is now a noticeably strong body of work unfolding, inspired by the ‘Arab Spring’

I notice recently that good watercolours are very well received and indeed my own solo show was a sell out. I certainly have a fan base here!

 Please share what has been your favorite commission in Saudi Arabia and why?

the-dome     What has been your most challenging commission in Saudi and why?

I shall answer the last two questions together

Being asked to paint the fine art work for the Leylaty Conference Hall or Wedding Hall as it used to be known was a huge commission.

I had to paint 24 large panels 2.2x 2mts wide, 6 oval panels, 2x 3.75 x 2.5 panels and a dome about 28 mts high with 8 panels each 5mts x 3mts.

This was to be in the French Baroque style as the interior of the building was to look like a Viennese Opera House.

The challenge was enormous just to get hold of reference materials given that there was no access to the internet at that time and that reference books with any material considered risqué was heavily censored. I devised many ways of getting what I wanted !

I was the only woman working on site of course and that posed some difficulties as well. Climbing down a 90 ft scaffold, donning an abaya, and hailing a taxi home every time I had to go to the bathroom was an interruption I could have done without.

The dome acted as a chimney or funnel for the extreme heat and of course the electrics were not connected till the end of the project—so no a/c.

I had a young friend of my son to help me with the dome. He had graduated from art school and this was his first job. He was motivated, and disciplined in the way that ‘public’ (private) schools in Scotland are famous for. With his help I was able at least to finish the dome in the time required. Once the scaffolding was removed the chandelier fitters from the USA were ready to pounce.

The pressure was huge and the project took 13 months.

Because of this long commitment it was only natural that it became my favourite at the time. It was hard to see it being handed over to chefs, and waiters and managers, people ready to set the whole operation in motion, when all that the building had been about up until then, was carpet fitting, canvas fitting, varnishing, marbling etc.

It was strange to hand over.

But of course I also have had favourite commissions in the UK

old-jeddah   How easy (or not) has it been for you as an artist to become settled and well-recognized in the Kingdom?

As far as becoming settled, I am very adaptable. I would say that is one of my strongest traits.

When one door closes, and many have, I immediately look for another one to open.

I am very focused, disciplined, and passionate about my work.

It was never my intention to become well recognized as an artist in the Kingdom.

Nor am I even now preoccupied with that.

On the other hand my work has been received so well and I have had such good publicity that recognition has been inevitable.

It will never be for me like it is for Saudi artists though.

This is a young country in some ways and the thriving art scene favours its own.

So I am content that my work has been exhibited in London and Shanghai for example and I have received awards from America.

As a renowned artist, what is your favorite medium with which to create art?  Why?

I love the transparency and the light that watercolour affords me when I paint. My work is all about the light.

Of course I also paint in oils and pastels but keep coming back to watercolour, the most difficult of all to master. It is that challenging aspect that keeps drawing me back to keep trying!

It is becoming a much more acceptable medium now amongst collectors. Galleries used to hate it because of freighting works under glass with all the associated problems of damage, insurance etc.

It used to be thought that watercolours were ‘fugitive’ but not now. Most pigments are permanent.

The perception amongst collectors was that watercolour was the second rate citizen and so galleries preferred to handle oils, finding them easier to sell.

It is changing though as shown by the number of recent exhibitions exclusively dedicated to watercolour.

Noteably the Watercolour Biennial in Shanghai. I took part in the second one in 2012 and was one of around 220 paintings selected out of 11,000.

Magazines (The Art of Watercolour) dedicated to this medium are now every bit as exciting as ones embracing oil painting and pastels. Watercolour used to be perceived as the preparatory work for an oil painting. Not any longer.

 

How do you get your inspiration to do so many vastly different pieces of art?

I will paint anything and everything provided the light has played a part.

The light changes ordinary objects into things of great beauty. Sometimes it can be just the light or shadow shapes themselves that are beautiful. Obscure, dull little corners can hold great promise when the sun streams in and that is what turns me on.

 

You also do interior design work and have even given some classes on refurbishing or changing the appearance of existing furniture.  Can you give some examples of what have been some of your favorite “make overs” and why?

I did interior design work and my training made it easier for me to interpret the brief when finding out what clients wished from me as a painter.

I antiqued walls and marbled columns, distressing furniture to match. But I have not practiced interior design in Saudi Arabia and would not want to.

 

There is an impression that most Saudis like to buy new furniture rather than have pieces refurbished or updated.  Do you agree or disagree?  Why?

Yes I agree. Most do not want refurbished pieces.

But I do know of a few who have some rather gorgeous antiques!

Did you ever expect when you arrived in Saudi Arabia that you would come to make it a long-time home?

Never

You’re originally from Scotland, have also lived in Argentina and spent time in London.  How does Saudi Arabia compare?  What has made the Kingdom most special to you?  young-shepherd

It was in Argentina that I had to learn to be so self sufficient –we are talking of the sixties and seventies.

There were electric generators in the estancia houses, no telephone, long distances travelled to buy provisions etc. I learned and I coped.

When I came to Saudi Arabia in the early nineties it was very different from today, in that I was unable to obtain much of the material required to carry out my work, and so I learned to improvise, invent and compromise as I had done in Argentina.

Now of course I can order certain things online and have them delivered here with a carrier.

This facility was not a possibility in the early nineties. Indeed satellite television was forbidden.

Now the world is open via the internet, an opportunity that the young Saudis have embraced this with relish. So they are learning and absorbing, learning also to be discerning, a new concept if you have not had the opportunity before to be so exposed to everything on offer.

They are learning about art from all over the world and importantly finding a voice through their art. That is wonderful.

Although my art is not about political dialogue, (I am well able for that through the spoken word!) I can see that as a vehicle for bringing about awareness, progress and change, albeit slowly, it is an ideal medium.

So I admire the new art of the Middle East.

My work is about making people feel glad when they see it. That is not to say it is a mere representation of what lies in front of me. There is much more to it than that.

Usually a story, a set of circumstances that have led me to choose a particular theme. But then it is about trying to paint as beautifully as I can. Simple!

As far as comparison with Scotland is concerned the common denominator is family and certainly when I was young, faith.

That still holds true for me and my friends at home and I would say the majority of decent people.

My country was shaped by a strict protestant God fearing faith. The values, education and conduct of our people were so influenced. That was how I was brought up.

It was not so difficult to identify with people who had similar values although a different faith.

I can identify with them totally.

The Kingdom has been good to me.

Your paintings show so much intricate detail whether a scene from a souk, an expatriate or a Saudi vendor in action.  How do you capture these details?  Are your subjects aware of your interest in them?  Do you take a photo first and then paint from the photo?  fruitseller-jeddah

I always begin my work with a study from life. This can entail a 3 or 4 hour session in front of the actual subject—if it is a building in the souq.

I have a permit to sit and paint and my architectural studies start as quick watercolours. From this I create my larger paintings at home, in the studio, with the added help of a photo. I frequently return to the site to check on a detail if I need to. It is on these occasions that I have found that whole buildings have disappeared in the space of a week or two. Many of my paintings are of buildings in Jeddah that are no longer there.

Very sad indeed!

If it is a figure, I usually make quick sketches and then take a photo. When they become aware of what I am doing they frequently want to ‘pose’—and this is not what I want!

I have had some hilarious moments with some of the subjects but I do always have to be very careful not to attract unwanted attention—for that can create a problem here.

The painting of the shepherd was started from life but became difficult when the other herdsmen started to press in too close and I could feel a pair of hands firmly pressing my thighs, possibly testing my suitability for market! So a photo was the next step. I returned a few days later to distribute some of the photos to their rightful owners. Interestingly, some of the men were laying claim to the wrong picture of themselves. Either mirrors did not feature large in their chosen lifestyles or it was a form of illiteracy. It was of course a revelation for me.  

The cheeky little black girl in the souq stood still for ages while I drew her. She was fascinated. Poor little mite should really have been at school –not out selling for a living. But then it was a wonderful opportunity for me.

I always purchase something from these kind ‘models’ so that they do not feel short changed!

And no I did not buy a sheep from the shepherd!

In the main, the folk around me, when I take up a painting position, are extremely solicitous, plying me with water to drink and making sure I am alright.

I paint very early in the morning starting before the shops are open –until midday.

I always wear a plain black abaya—nothing eyecatching,  but do not cover my hair. If anyone protests at this –it is usually the women I have found.

 I have felt privileged to record the Old Souq in Jeddah. It has been a huge inspiration for me as an artist and of course I just love crumbling old buildings with a history in the very fabric of their walls.

I am sad that this is a vanishing landscape however, and that future generations will just have to refer to photos, paintings and perhaps a re-creation of what is authentic.

But at least I have played a part in that.

What is a typical week in Saudi Arabia like for you?

I am usually very focused but at the moment quite frantic!

I fly home every 6 weeks to see my mother who will be 100 years old in July inshallah!

I am teaching as well as preparing for an Open House on the 29th and 30th of May with the help of Susan.

I paint on the days I am not teaching, sometimes visiting the souq or arranging a still life in the studio.

I scan my work and upload to my website.

When I am in Spain in the summer however I garden and watch my flowers grow. I paint in the afternoons and enjoy the evenings with my husband.

Where do you hope to see yourself five years from now?

Relaxing I hope! But never far away from my watercolour palette!

You have lived in Saudi Arabia for many years and mix naturally between the Saudi and expatriate community.  What advice do you give to new arrivals to Saudi Arabia on how they can make the best and most enriching time of their Saudi experience?

the-goatherd

Learn something of the background history of the people—history has always fascinated, and in turn local customs. Allow the people to show you their customs and be genuinely interested in the human element of their stories which they will love to tell you.

You can then be ambassadors when you return and help dispel stereotipic myths.

Some things don’t change however, and you are a guest. Remember that.

 

How can interested readers contact you and learn more about your art?

Anyone who is interested in my work can contact me through my website www.dorothyboyer.com where I post blogs and send newsletters.

I am on facebook at DorothyBoyerFineArt and twitter @DBoyerFineArt should anyone wish to follow me!

My representative is Susan Schuster without whose help I would not be able to function! Her email is arabianaccents@yahoo.com

 

Is there anything else you’d like to add?

Just to say a big thank you again for giving me the chance to talk to you and thrilled indeed that I can communicate through my art.

 

Thanks again for this interview and sharing with American Bedu readers.

 

Saudi Arabia: Surgical Paralysis – It’s All Up to the Judges

surgical paralysis

usnews.com

 

A Saudi judge has sentenced a 24 year old Saudi man to surgical paralysis if he can’t raise US$270,000 towards blood money for the aggrieved family.  This ruling stems back to an incident which occurred ten years old when Ali Al-Khawahir, who was only 14 years old at the time, had an altercation with a childhood friend.  Al-Khawahir, in his anger and rage, stabbed the friend in the back with a knife which resulted in the friend being paralyzed from the waist down.

At the time of the crime, the friend and his family demanded 1,000,000 SAR in blood money as retribution.  Al-Khawahir’s family had no access to such a vast amount and Al-Khawahir was imprisoned instead.

It is not clear why the ruling to now inflict surgical paralysis has been raised in this current date and time.  Al-Khawahir has already spent ten of his most formulative years of his life in prison.

The fact that a Saudi court has ruled in favor of surgical paralysis on Al-Khawahir for an incident which occurred ten years ago now makes one wonder about what the future will hold for another young Saudi man.  A Saudi woman refused retribution of six million SAR when she became paralyzed in an accident which was found to be the fault of the young Saudi man.  Instead, she requested that the man who paralyzed her in turn be surgically paralyzed.  However, the ruling judge in Jeddah requested the woman reconsider and deferred on making a verdict.

It is the opinion of American Bedu that neither individually will be surgically paralyzed.  In the case of Al-Khawahir since a sum of money is involved, it is highly likely a benefactor will come forward and pay the amount on his family’s behalf.

However, both of these cases due question the legitimacy, boundaries and authorities of Saudi judges.  One judge made it obvious he was against such a demand and another judge ruled that it was “okay.”  While the Quran may cite “an eye for an eye,” the true practice of Islam is to be kind and forgiving.

Saudi Arabia: AlNahdi Medical Company Launches ‘Kolna Amal’

al nahda 1

اطلقت شركة النهدي حملة  بداية الشهر بعنوان “كلنا أمل” لدعم أطفال السرطان

وضعت الشركة منصات في عدة مراكز تجارية في جدة حيث ان كل شخص يتصور عند المنصة، سيتم التبرع بمبلغ قدره خمسة ريالات لمؤسسة سند لأطفال السرطان.

والجدير بالذكر أن النهدي تعاقدوا مع عمر حسين، مقدم البرنامج الشهير على اليوتيوب “على الطاير” حتى يكون سفيرا لهذه الحملة.. وقرر عمر حسين أن يحلق شعر رأسه كليا حتى يظهر تضامنه مع أطفال السرطان.  أيضا بدأت الحملة هاشتاق على تويتر وهو #كلناـأمل حتى تصل الى أكبر قدر ممكن من الناس.

اليوم، ٣ ابريل ٢٠١٣، ستكمل الحملة طريقها في مجمعات جدة المركزية.. . نتمنى من الجميع مشاركتنا في نشر الأمل.

al nahda 2

AlNahdi Medical Company has launched a great campaign called “Kolna Amal” to support children with cancer around Saudi Arabia in line with launching their new brand identity.

 al nahda 3

Starting this month, the campaign rolled out in different big malls in Jeddah. Where they have set up stands in each mall, inviting big influencers in the society to encourage people to join and take pictures next to the stand, and for each picture taken, AlNahdi will donate 5 riyals to Sanad, the children cancer association.

 

Last week, AlNahdi collaborated with the Saudi influencer Omar Alhussein, in order to be the ambassador of this campaign. Where he went to the stand to encourage people to take pictures. To add more buzz to the campaign, Omar AlHussein shaved his head to support the cause.

al nahda 4

The hashtag    #كلناـأمل  was also created spread and support the campaign even more

 

Today, April 3rd, ALNahdi stand are set up around Jeddah malls, you can go and join such a fun, and great cause.

 

Saudi Arabia: Saudi’s First Flash Mob!

 

Other than the fact it is only men participating, this flash mob could have taken place in just about anywhere in the world.  It featured music, dancing and individuals having a great time.  What makes this flash mob unique, is that it took place in conservative Saudi Arabia where dancing and music are usually prohibited in public places.  Yet in this flash mob, you do not see a single member from the Ministry of the Protection of Virtual and Prevention of Vice (Muttawa) on site.  Instead, it is people who are all enjoying themselves and having a good time.  Yes; when panning to the crowd the women are wearing abayas but in most cases have not covered their face.  There are young men wearing shorts and many others in typical Western dress as seen in New York, London or Paris.  This event was part of a promotion for a company based in Jeddah, Saudi Arabia.  While it may not be what some would view as a “traditional” flash mob, it is a flash mob Saudi style which was undoubtedly a success!

Saudi Arabia: What Would YOUR Documentary Be About?

New Zealand, North Island, Northland, Te Paki Sanddunes

johnallengay.wordpress.com

 

 

As the American Bedu documentary is in final edits, it has me wondering about others who are in or have been to the Kingdom or simply have a keen interest in the Kingdom.  If you were to create your own documentary sharing some aspect of Saudi Arabia, what would it be about?  Where would you choose to focus and why?

The American Bedu documentary is my life story but that includes a significant chapter of life in Saudi Arabia.  My chapter shares the love story between me and my late Saudi husband, meeting his family and how I was accepted into Saudi society.

However, everyone who is in or has been to Saudi Arabia will have a different story depending on the circumstances which brought them to the Kingdom and where they are located too.

The Kingdom truly is a country of ever shifting sands.  Those in Jeddah will know they are in a different country yet Jeddah will have a cosmopolitan feel and is relatively open.  Individuals, Saudis and expats alike will have more freedoms.

Whereas Riyadh by comparison is much more conservative and closed.  People are watchful and guarded in both how they dress and what they may say in public.

People in  Makkah and Medina are overall open and welcoming of all the international visitors who have come to perform Hajj and Umra.  Yet, unlike Riyadh or Jeddah, the majority of visitors to Makkah or Medina are Muslims and only Muslims are allowed in to the inner heart of these cities.

There are many cities and towns in between and each of them also has something unique to offer by way of customs, cultures and traditions.  In my opinion, one either hates the Kingdom and simply bides their time until they leave or the Kingdom gets into your blood and you have a bond and special place with Saudi Arabia for the rest of your life.

 

Saudi Arabia: You Don’t Want to Miss Ignite Jeddah!

ignite jeddah

“Ignite is an international geek event for people with passion and eagerness to know and share. The speakers share their personal and professional stories to inspire you. Ignite was started by Brady Forrest, who is the Technology Evangelist for O’Reilly Media, and by Bre Pettis of Makerbot.com The first Ignite took place in Seattle in 2006, and since then the event has become an international phenomenon, with gatherings in Helsinki, Finland; Paris, France; New York, New York; and many other locations.

At Ignite Jeddah, 20 well-known and educated youth will talk about their personal and professional stories. It’s going to be a wonderful night of motivation and success stories. The event is hosted by Effat University, and organized by theEffat SG (Effat University Student Government). It will take place of 7th March in the Effat Hall from 5:00 – 10:30 PM

Registration is at -> http://ignitejeddah-es2005.eventbrite.com/?rank=1
Tickets cost only 100 SR and they will be sold at Virgin Megastores and at the day of the event. It’s very important to register online, and once the tickets are available e-mails will be sent to the people who registered.
To stay in touch with us->
Website: www.ignitejeddah.net
Email: igniteJeddah@effat.edu.sa
Phone:+96626364300 Ext : 5405
Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/IgniteJeddah “

Saudi Arabia: What Exactly is an Eye for an Eye

empty_wheelchair

disabilityrightsca.org

In Saudi Arabia, justice can be swift and harsh.  Depending on the nature of the crime, a person can be publicly beheaded.  In other cases, towards avoiding a beheading or lengthy jail term, the family of the ‘guilty party’ may pay “diyyah” or blood money to the victim or the victim’s family.  The victim or the victim’s family are the ones who set the terms and amount of the diyyah.  There are also family’s who have chosen to forgive the guilty party without receiving diyyah and who wish for the guilty party to not undergo a punishment or time in jail.

So, what exactly is an eye for an eye and where did this term come from in the Muslim world?

According to Wikipedia, “An eye for an eye is the principle that a person who has injured another person is penalized to a similar degree, or according to other interpretations the victim receives the value of the injury in compensation. According to Jewish interpretations the victim in criminal law gets financial compensation based on the law of human equality eschewing mutilation and ‘lex talionis’.[1]

The English word talion means a retaliation authorized by law, in which the punishment corresponds in kind and degree to the injury, from the Latin talio.[2] The phrase “an eye for an eye” is sometimes trivially referred to using the Latin term lex talionis, the law of talion.”

The Qur’an mentions the “eye for an eye” concept as being ordained for the Children of Israel.[18] The principle of Lex talionis in Islam is Qasas (قصاص) as mentioned in (Qur’an 2:178) “O you who have believed, prescribed for you is legal retribution (Qasas) for those murdered – the free for the free, the slave for the slave, and the female for the female. But whoever overlooks from his brother anything, then there should be a suitable follow-up and payment to him with good conduct. This is an alleviation from your Lord and a mercy. But whoever transgresses after that will have a painful punishment.”. Some Muslim nations, still apply the rule, in accordance with the Mosaic Law. In some countries that use Islamic law (sharia), the “eye for an eye” rule is applied quite literally.[19][20]

A judge in Jeddah is presently faced with a dilemma on whether to literally apply the law as an eye for an eye.  A young Saudi woman was paralyzed in an auto accident shortly after her honeymoon.  The driver of the other vehicle was convicted of speeding and reckless driving and therefore found to be responsible for the accident which left the young woman paralyzed.  The driver has offered to give the young woman 6 million SAR in financial compensation. blood-money

However, the young woman has been adamant in her refusal to accept anything less than an eye for an eye.  She insists that the only fair and just punishment is for the driver to receive the same fate that she herself must now live.  She wants the court to sentence the driver to become paralyzed.

The verdict of the judge in charge of this case has yet to be handed down.  What do you think?  Is the young woman’s request fair and just?  Should she accept the money?

Do you see the woman as being too vindictive?  Is her attitude reflective of how Islam is to be practiced?

Saudi Arabia: Basketball Growing in Popularity Among Both Men and Women

Saudi-basketball-federation

Although not a sport one would initially associate with Saudi Arabia as compared to soccer, basketball is growing in popularity among young and old, male and female.

By way of background, Saudi Arabia has been a member of FIBA Asia , the International Basketball Federation, since 1964.  The Saudi Arabian national basketball team is administrated by the Saudi Arabian Basketball Association.  The biggest success of Saudi’s National Team was a bronze medal in 1999 at the Asian Championship.

However, an organization that is capturing global attention in the world of basketball is Jeddah United.  Jeddah United has both male and female teams who play for the thrill of the game and in global competitions.  Jeddah United is the first sports company established in 2006 in Jeddah and a trailblazer in promoting basketball, football and sportsmanship for women and youth in the Kingdom.  jeddah_united_basketball_team_website

The coaches and trainers of Jeddah United received their training from American National Basketball Association (NBA) officials.  Jeddah United coaches and trainers share their love of the game with players in addition to instilling additional self-confidence in the players.

Lina Almaeena, is a key player with Jeddah United and shared some insights with American Bedu.

“Let me put it to you this way, for males, basketball is the number 2 sports in Saudi Arabia after football, no doubt.

 

However, for females, out of my experience in the sports field as a private sector for a decade, I would say without hesitation that Basketball is the number ONE sport for females.  Reason for that is that in “private schools” where PE was allowed vs “gov banned PE” , we had sports facility and for basketball , and volleyball. no soccer field was ever available in Saudi private schools.

 

Jeddah United 2   First female private school “Dar Alhanan” established in 1955, started sports programs in the 60′s had basketball and volleyball training.  But the competitive edge of basketball and the contact element , empowered by the media in many media outlets, movies, cartoons, have contributed in the rise of basketball in Saudi Arabia as well. We were molded into a global village throughout the years of the media and technology revolution.

 

Jeddah United Sports Co. was the first local sports company that promoted sports for girls and boys in (different segregated divisions) through sports training academies and sports events management,  We have used sports as tools throughout our events to send out certain messages like “No smoking ” “Drink Milk” “Father and Son” and “Cancer compassion” tournaments.

 

As we speak, the government is in the process of integrating PE in public girls schools.  We are happy thinking that our initiative and media campaigns have contributed among many other factors, lke the rise of obesity, diabetes, osteoporosis, etc, and social problems, etc to creating a national debate about PE and sports in general.

 

When we first started our team in 2003, followed by a licensed organization in 2006, we went through phases of media rejection, to segments sarcasm, to labeling by some highest religious authorities, but we kept going.  Our teams international games were televised for the first time in history in 2009 in Jordan where we didn’t just play sports in Saudi Arabia, but actually took to international level and we made it front page at the time in almost every newspaper in the country.

 

As we speak today after the Olympics, I think we have won the battle of “to play or not to play” even though there are still areas where they oppose competitive sports .  But I believe that harder work comes now with the implementation process and teaching UN definitions of sports “respecting opponents” and winning with pride as well as losing with pride!”

 

But what draws the Saudi men or women to basketball?

According to Lina, “I come from a sports oriented family culture. As growing up my parents put us in tennis programs, swimming, aerobics, karate etc . But I honestly believe my uncle was the reason I fell in love with basketball.  He used to coach us and play basketball with us everywhere, in every family garage, by his private beach cabin. He would buy hoops and place it everywhere he could. And  we would invite our friends and family members and play ! Meanwhile, I was playing basketball in school as I was in a ( private schoo) In high school I became captain of CWS Children’s World School high school. They had amazing basketball coaches, it was a very progressive school owner, Sana Abu Dawood.

 

 

Basketball makes me feel ecstatic, motivated, empowered and it was a treatment for me from post partum depression in 2003, after my first baby, which was one of the main reasons I founded the team, which i called “the Jaguars” initially, then it evolved into Jeddah United as the vision transferred from a private initiative to a national campaign.”

 

As Lina puts it, “I became a basketball MOM, versus the US soccer moms!”  Jeddah United

 

I asked her what has been the “secret” in making more Saudis begin to get interested in basketball.  According to Lina, “The secret is that I found salvation through basketball, the level of commitment is soooo much higher than any physical activity as the core concept is “TEAM” Together Everyone Achieves More.”

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