How Safe is Saudi Arabia?

A common question I am asked by Americans, and especially those who have never been to Saudi Arabia is, “How safe is Saudi Arabia?”  Speaking candidly, I actually felt safer and more secure in Saudi Arabia than many other places where I have lived to include America.  I’m not denying that there are zero threats in Saudi Arabia, but when you look at the big picture and greater likelihoods of threat to an individual’s safety, there remains less crime, sale and/or use of drugs, gangs, theft or home invasions in Saudi Arabia than USA.

According to the Crime in America web site, there are 774,000 gang members and 27,900 gangs active in the United States.  Crime in America has reported that 25 million individuals have used an illicit drug.  Violence continues to increase each year in America’s schools.  The composition in America continues to change with the influx of different ethnic groups, especially Hispanic and latino.  The Homeless of America continue to increase and may still increase if economic reforms and creation of new jobs does not take effect soon.

In Saudi Arabia fewer homes are less likely to have a security alarm system than the number of homes in America.  Risks of home invasion and/or burglary increase in Saudi Arabia if a residence is in a remote and secluded area.  The esterahah, which is like a simple small farm, is typically located on the outskirts of city areas and where residents go on weekends to relax.  To minimize the risk of a home invasion or burglary, individuals who live in more remote and private areas will be more likely to have an alarm system as compared to the many residents who live within cities and in compounds or private villas.

Another factor which has an impact towards lower crime in Saudi Arabia than America is also the penalties for committing certain crimes in the Kingdom.  The sale or use of drugs holds a stiff penalty – death.  Thievery and home invasion have steep penalties too.  Saudi schools do not have the police presence or metal detectors to ensure that students are not being allowed into the school with dangerous weapons such as at some schools now in America.

In regards to terrorism, such as being targeted by Al Qaida, Al Qaida is less likely to go after a single individual.  Saudi Arabia takes the protection of its citizens, both Saudi nationals and expatriate workers, very seriously.  All compounds have security.  Many compounds have multiple layers of security.  Most compounds are protected by soldiers from the Saudi Arabian National Guard.

In conclusion, threats are everywhere and the range of threats is great.  And I do not think one should be fearful of pursuing an opportunity in Saudi Arabia.

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43 Responses

  1. Well said…:)

  2. Why would you compare the crime rates in a police state to the crime rates in a free society? And even if there was any validity to such comparisons, why would you compare crime rates between two such wildly different cultures?

    Sorry, but that makes no sense to me. Also, your post looks somewhat like a marketing pitch for potential expats to come to KSA. I sincerely hope I’m never seeing somebody blogging about you with a “Why didn’t she know what could happen to her in KSA!?” tagline. DO YOU know what can happen to you in KSA? How severely without rights of any kind you are in the Kingdom? If so, why are you making posts like this which make it seem like a paradise where nothing bad ever happens? And if you don’t… what are you doing there?

  3. You forgot to mention that the stiff penalities are for expat menial laborers and women who flout the law…saudi men get a pass for the most part.

  4. I wish i could agree with your post, Carol, but i definitely cannot. I was never the victim of crime in the U.S. nor did i personally know anyone who was. In Saudi i have been a victim twice. Once when my villa was robbed by three men in the middle of the night while we were sleeping. It was not in a secluded area. In the middle of Olaya. The other was in Faisalia mall when my purse was stolen. Our relative’s house, also in posh Olaya, was robbed while he was out with his family. My husband has two friends it happened to. It is a huge problem and one reason i will never again live outside of a compound! Why is it a huge problem? According to the police, largely to feed drug habits. We also had a friend whose daughter was kidnapped for several weeks (alhamdullilah, she was finally returned). She was kidnapped while walking to a friend’s house only two doors down – again in an upscale neighborhood. Think about it – everyone is behind a wall with no view to or from the street. It’s a crimminal’s paradise! My daughter’s friend witnessed a car drive up behind a family (mahram present) and try to snatch a purse from a woman. She naturally reacted by clutching the bag and was dragged several meters down the pavement before she let go! You know and i know that it is possible for a woman to walk the streets alone in the U.S. Not so here. Even if there is not kidnapping there is always harassment of both women and young men. I had a friend whose tall, blond, 17 year old son was uncomfortable walking to the local market because car loads of guys were always stopping with propositions. I have many other first hand accounts related by friends or family, but this post is already long. I don’t really consider this a safe society at all. I am not bashing here. These are all personal, real experiences and i think that people need to be aware, especially if you are new here. It is not Islamic paradise!!

  5. Donna,

    I’ve heard about purses and phones being snatched. We live in a neighborhood where there are several princes so no one gets in or out of the area without someone noticing them. The drivers are like the ‘neighborhood watch’ groups in the states.

    I have heard of several people being harassed as well. At times, I feel that it’s a great way of convincing the expats in the Kingdom for the need of mahrems for protection so that we don’t push too hard for women’s rights in this country.

    I mean, if women can drive tomorrow, what will happen to the thousands of Pakistanis, Indians, and Asians in this country? How will they be able to make the kind of money they are making now as drivers to support their families back in their home countries?

    These guys are also an excellent sources of information concerning security in this country. Who else knows all of your friends, where they live, where you shop, whom you work for, the restaurants where you eat, etc., etc.

  6. Can single, American women visit the Kingdom on vacation? We want to go shopping and just add the country to our list of countries visited. We are all residents of Kuwait. Any information would be helpful. Thank you. :)

    I do feel much safer living in Kuwait then America. Except for the driving. I am a tall, blonde girl and most Kuwaitis leave Westerners alone…(except for major flirting). However, if I looked Asian or Black I would be afraid for my safety. If some bad Kuwaitis think you are Indian, Asian or African they might try to kidnap you and take you to the desert. I read about it every day in the Arab times newspaper.

  7. OK, so you didn’t let my comment through moderation. I understand.

    But there went your claims about safety in KSA. You don’t even feel safe enough to let controversial comments through, on a personal blog :)

  8. Appreciate all the comments and differing perspectives. i can say from my own personal perspectives I have been in many diverse areas of Saudi from affluent to very poor. My experiences have all been positive. On a whole, as compared to other places, I consider Saudi a safe place to live and work.

    This post is not to deny that crime never happens, that would be absurd. Overall, I have felt safer in the Kingdom than in USA. That’s my experience.

    Women can not come to Saudi yet simply as tourists to shop unless part of an organized group – which is slowly happening now.

    @Craig – All first time comments automatically go into moderation. It is not because of fear but being practical towards avoiding some of the techniques used by spammers.

  9. Agree!!!

    It is safer in some ways in KSA. I have not lived there but have lived in other GCC states. Protection of western expats is taken very very seriously.
    Carol,
    so so good news. I have some offers from KSA-in safe highly secured compound. I know it is tough in some places there but in a strict society as such, there is less crime.

  10. I must say that if my home in Canada was constructed like fortress as are most Saudi homes I wouldn’t worry much about break and enters.
    When I tell people I’ve recently returned from KSA one of the first questions is “did you feel safe” or “weren’t you scared?”
    I mostly felt safe except for the odd time I was looked at by a mutawa.
    I did not walk on the residential streets alone only because it felt very creepy to me to see nothing but high walls and no people. People ‘drive’ in KSA and don’t walk. I have never been afraid to walk alone at home in Canada. I agree with the poster above who said the streets could ‘potentially’ be unsafe in residential areas because residents can’t/won’t look out their windows to the street.

    KSA is certainly NOT crimeless. Drunk drivers and drug users can be of great danger as well as young men with nothing to do but harass.

  11. This is certainly an odd piece. Is your intention to show that Saudi Arabia is safe for expats? At that level I would guess your article does what you want. Why do you need to make comparisons with the US? Conditions are very very different and comparing a relatively free country with conditions in what amounts to a police state are absurd.

    If Saudi Arabia is so safe for foreigners, why do you need compounds guarded by the national guard? If Saudi Arabia is so safe why do people in Saudi blogs talk about how dangerous young drivers are on the road? Saudi Arabia is ‘safe’ because it keeps its women under a shroud. Is that the kind of safety any American really wants.

    I spent a bunch of years living in rural MN. Virtually no crime, no home invasions, safe roads (except when covered by ice).

  12. Good questions and comments.

    This article was written in response to the commonly query I get asked from Americans on whether I felt safe in KSA. So the article is written in respond to that frequent query. I make comparisons to the USA since I’m being asked this question by Americans who need a base for comparison.

    The majority of Western expats live either in the diplomatic quarters or Western compounds in order to pursue the lifestyle with which they are familiar. It is NOT only about safety.

    Road habits are an entirely different kettle of fish which I have written about in the past.

    The safety issue I am asked stems from a misplaced conception that Al Qaida is “around every corner” in KSA, just waiting to attack that foreigner. Is there an Al Qaida threat in KSA? Yes. But not how many unfamiliar or have never traveled to KSA perceive. Is there an Al Qaida threat to USA? Yes. Some may believe the threat is not as high as compared to Saudi Arabia which shares the border with Yemen, home of Al Qaida in the Arabian Peninsula. But then again, it only takes one successful strike to instill fear and many other emotions.

    However people can not put lives and opportunities on hold because of threats or fears. So with this post I am also wanting to reassure expats or potential expats to Saudi Arabia that active security measures are in place for all (like America too) and the every day dangers do exist but minimal as compared to locations within America.

  13. Bedu, the impressions I’m getting, and I could be wrong, is that life is “safe” behind walls and compounds; and that more so if you are a particular expat, but not quiet so if you live outside these- posh or not neighborhood.

    Living in NYC is by far not the most safest- by any stretch of the imagination- yet I can travel by foot, taxi, train or bus at 2:00 am in the morning by myself and not encounter danger nor feel fearful. That I personally have never been mugged, or has my apartment broken into- doesn’t mean another 1000 have been so lucky- luck maybe the only answer to explain it. Because some of the examples presented were of people not looking for trouble or in ‘hot spots’.

    With regards to Al-Qaeda- its home is international- though I believe originally in America we pinned it on Afghanistan, then on Iraq and then everywhere else. Yemen is the latest ‘Cousin It’. And in that country I have always felt safe, because I watch where I’m going and try not to stick out in my behavior.

    I guess all Americans and all others can do when thinking about going to places where they don’t have ‘relatives’ or ‘solid reasons’ is think it all out and consider if it is really worth their while.

  14. @Inal,

    I did not live in a typical compound at all. I was the only non-Saudi (who was not either a housemaid or driver) who lived in the compound. It did not have National Guard security and rarely had security. Yes, like most Saudi residences, we had walls around the villa, but I routinely took evening walks by myself. I would go with my bag of cat food and put out food in various places for the stray cats. I never encountered difficulties or harassment. I’ve gone around Riyadh by myself without incident. At the same time, anyone no matter where, should be aware of their surroundings and avoid areas known to have problems.

  15. I understand Bedu- like I stated at the beginning- they were my impressions, and that I could be wrong. Sincerely, I stand corrected.

  16. Inal,

    I apologize if my comment sounded harsh or defensive – that was not my intent. I truly appreciate your impressions!

  17. Fair enough about the moderation. I saw other comments made after mine getting through and thought you’d decided not to publish mine :)

    So the article is written in respond to that frequent query. I make comparisons to the USA since I’m being asked this question by Americans who need a base for comparison.

    Well, since the US has some of the highest crime rates in the world I think it’s safe to assume they weren’t asking about whether or not it was “safe” in terms of routine crime. I’ve been to quite a few countries that didn’t have democracy, and I’ve never been concerned about being mugged or having my stuff stolen or etc… having lived in some bad parts of the US, I know how to protect myself from such things pretty well. What I’ve always worried about is being victimized by the authorities.

  18. @Craig,

    The query addressed to me was more in terms of stability and safety as an expat. On the average, it is unusual for an American to be victimized by authorities in Saudi Arabia unless he or she were caught red-handed engaging in an activity that is clearly illegal.

    However the bottom line is no matter where someone is going to travel, it’s always prudent to do advance research.

  19. On the average, it is unusual for an American to be victimized by authorities in Saudi Arabia unless he or she were caught red-handed engaging in an activity that is clearly illegal.

    I think that’s a dangerous assumption a lot of Americans make. Maybe because it’s usually true. But when the reality sinks in that power is what matters rather than law, it can be quite a shock. Especially for Americans, who tend to think that’s not how things are supposed to work. I’ll give an example which makes me look bad, but I’ll do it anyway because it’s the best I can come up with from personal experience.

    A long time ago when I was in the Marines, I was spent some time in the Philippines. The area around Subic bay back then was really bad… not a touristy type place at all. One time while I was wandering around Olongapo drunk as usual, a long haired sleazy looking American guy (obviously civilian) came up to me and started asking how he could buy some pot. He was talking about a LOT of pot. And he was talking about going out into the provinces alone to find it. I tried to convince him to get his crazy self back to manila, where he belonged. He wouldn’t listen. I was annoyed (and drunk) enough at that point that I decided to just knock him on his ass, in broad daylight, on a crowded street, in front of a couple cops. Which is what I did. Nobody saw a thing. When he went up to the cops, they suddenly couldn’t speak English. He scampered off. Hopefully back to manila. If so, I probably saved his life. If not, then he’s probably an unsolved missing persons case from the Marcos era along with so many others.

    I’m not telling this story to make Filipinos look bad. I love the Philippines, and Filipinos are amongst the warmest and friendliest people on earth in my estimation. I’m just saying that relying on American power and prestige to keep you safe in foreign countries is not wise in countries where respect for the rights of individuals is non-existent. That plan falls apart as soon as you run into somebody with enough power and prestige that it trumps the courtesy extended to you by virtue of your nationality.

    However the bottom line is no matter where someone is going to travel, it’s always prudent to do advance research.

    I totally agree with you there :)

  20. I also want to add that when Canadians are asking me about feeling safe or frightened in KSA it wasn’t about terrorism … it was about the police and mutawa. Terrorism is not the first thing on Canadian minds. :-}

  21. I think Canadians are universally well-liked! (smile)

  22. donna,did american embassy EVACUATE u? and bring u back home safely? plz take RoseColoredGlasses, with u,she is totaly bias and hopeless!haha

  23. Central Intelligence Agency (CIA) is involved in drug smuggling from Afghanistan. Ahmed Wali Karzai, the brother of the president (Hamid Karzai) of Afghanistan, gets regular payments from the CIA and has for much of the past eight years. CIA is directly working with RAW to destabilize to divide and capture part of the Balochistan so they have route to smuggle drugs out of Afghanistan. This is one of the reason USA/CIA doesn’t want Pakistan to fence and mine the PAK/Afghan border.
    George Bush government support CIA, Obama, Hillery all supporting CIA and RAW agent working in Afghanistan and Pakistan.

  24. Hey,

    I’m a Saudi (lived in Riyadh) girl living in US. Yes, I feel safer in Saudi. Exept the driving part, driving in Saudi is crazy.

    In US, I see homeless injecting themselves and smoking up. My American female friends, most of them got rapped. And they act like it’s a normal thing to happen in any girls life!!

    In NY times squre, I heared shooting and that FREAKED ME OUT. THis thing would never happen in Saudi at least in public place.

    I live in California, I have local friends and a good number of them know some1 who got shot !!!!!!!! In Saudi I know know one got shot, nor anyone knows someone who got shot.

    I think criminals in US feel that they can get away with their crimes.

    I would like to put one thing in mind, some of the posts are people who are living in small towns did not like the article. That’s just being closed minded, US is a large country. the article is about US as a whole not your tinny village.

  25. @Lulu,

    Welcome to American Bedu and thank you for commenting. I would enjoy hearing more of your views and perspectives on being a Saudi female student in the United States too!!

  26. Dear AB
    Thanks for the blog on safety, I came to KSA recently on 26 th April. Before my arrival I did a lot of enquiries and then made up my mind to come.
    To me it looked as though that there are no security issues, but time and again when I feel like settling downwith that idea some aquaintance comes up with a horror story.
    Just yesterday when I was about to make a statement that ‘Indian’s(as I am an Indian) here are so intimidated that they just do not want to even come down in front of their home while children could play outdoors’ he shot back you know a teacher was abducted by four expats in Hara and r…; she was hospitilised and died two days ago!!!
    I was taken aback, did’nt know how to react; he might be right or just replaying rumour he heard from some one else.
    Then he continued with another two stories one of which involved the Saudi Police abducting a woman and …. who returned back.
    Now understand my situation, I am being pushed in a situation where my faith even in the Police is lost; is that too when my family would be arriving in couple of weeks.
    Is this a deliberate mischief just to make to a nervous wreck or a advise with good intentions?
    I have no idea.
    Then I started internet and stumbled across your blog again, to me personally it seems as if some Saudi’s and also some expats are inclined to create an environment where the existing isolation continues andnoone dares to question why you simply can’t walk two doors across to meet a friend.
    There is something fishy, but after listening to all such nonsense it is rather doubtful if I can advise my wife to stand in front of the building and overlook my kids riding bikes or play in out doors.
    Your blog gave a sense of security but then the comments that followed are something else.
    Finally I feel it is up to you either to take a bit of risk and live with a bit of normal life, or simply lock yourself inside homes where you can be assured of much more safety and limit yourself to going out to Malls, parks with Maharem.
    And as someone else pointed out it also seems to be an effort to maintain strict ly peple less neghbourhood.
    Only god knows in this land of god’s home!

  27. Dear AB
    Thanks for the blog on safety, I came to KSA recently on 26 th April. Before my arrival I did a lot of enquiries and then made up my mind to come.
    To me it looked as though that there are no security issues, but time and again when I feel like settling downwith that idea some aquaintance comes up with a horror story.
    Just yesterday when I was about to make a statement that ‘Indian’s(as I am an Indian) here are so intimidated that they just do not want to even come down in front of their home while children could play outdoors’ my friend shot back you know a teacher was abducted by four expats in Hara and r…; she was hospitilised and died two days ago!!!
    I was taken aback, did’nt know how to react; he might be right or just replaying rumours he heard from some one else.
    Then he continued with another two stories one of which involved the Saudi Police abducting a woman and r….. who returned back after a week.And when her husband reported in police they did not bother to register a case!!!!
    Now understand my situation, I am being pushed in a situation where my faith even in the Police is lost; that too when my family would be arriving in couple of weeks.
    Is this a deliberate mischief just to make ypu a nervous wreck or a advise with good intentions?
    I have no idea.
    Then I started internet search and stumbled across your blog again.
    To me personally it seems as if some Saudi’s and also some expats are inclined to create an environment where the existing isolation and intimidation continues and no one dares to question why you simply can’t walk two doors across to meet a friend.
    There is something fishy here.
    But after listening to all such nonsense it is rather doubtful if I can advise my wife to stand in front of the building and overlook my kids riding bikes or play in out doors (which simply does not happen here at all).

    Your blog gave a sense of security but then the comments that followed are something else.
    Finally I feel it is up to you either to take a bit (you can’t be sure if it will turn out to be a bit or huge) of risk and live with a bit of normal life, or …………..simply lock yourself inside homes where you can be assured of much more safety and limit yourself to going out to Malls, parks with Maharem.
    And as someone else pointed out it also seems to be an effort to maintain strict ly peple less neghbourhood and thawrt change.
    Only god knows in this land of god’s home!

  28. @Arif,

    What I can say to you is that I do know many Indian nationals with their families in Saudi Arabia. Some live in compounds and some do not. The ones who I know are content in Saudi and feel secure.

    The expatriate life in Saudi Arabia is not for everyone. Yes, the pay and benefits are usually very enticing and lures someone who may not be sure or aware of Saudi’s culture to accept a position without having the right disposition to adapt to the Kingdom.

    The bottom line in my view is to not live life in a bubble. Know the area where you are living/working. Know the culture and customs. Don’t venture into areas known for problems (crime, drugs, etc.) and be alert to surroundings. This advise applies everywhere and is certainly not limited to Saudi Arabia.

  29. Dear Ab
    Thanks a lot and appreciate your quick response, personally this place is atleast as safe as my home country (or may be a bit better) so I have no issues at all and in both these places you have to be alert (and your advise is correct).
    Also the issue of resloving various govt. departmental precedures is also similar however one has to go through a learning curve, understand the place and then make the best out of life here.
    Arif

  30. Dear Arif,

    You’re welcome. I am taking a guess by your name that perhaps your home country is Pakistan?

  31. Oh you guessed it a bit wrong; I am from India, Andhra Pradesh- Hyderabad

  32. thanks for clarifying, Arif.

  33. AB
    Continuing on this topic again, this weekend I went to meet friends from Riyadh to Dammam.
    About 90 % of passengers were Saudi’s and among them about 70 % were women.
    I had an opportunity to observe very closely and speak to a couple of Saudi’s.
    As you had been educating time and again that Saudi’s are basically good – i am in complete agreement with you.
    There was a lot of discipline and composure in them, the young boys never bothered any women on board, neither it seemed as if Women were extroordinarily constrained to travel in complete segregation.
    There was unhindered movement within train compartments of both genders from and to the cabin where cafeteria was present.
    I happened to occupy one of the seats belonging to a Saudi which I found temporarily empty, he came back and requested with a broad smile that he was seated there,(my seat was occupied by an Elderly person so did not bother him), I sat in the adjacent one, he said there is another one there and reflected today its a bit congested.
    He did not demand me to vacate!
    However most of them spoke very less among each other unlike kids and osme women who were busy in conversations, kids were shouting and playing around.
    Neither were Saudi women conservative, some of them wore modern dresses inside their Abaya’s (as observed from slits of Abaya) and seemed to be as modern as their counterparts in other muslim countries (hope my assumptions woud’nt be questioned); had their laptops and were probably surfing the web.
    The segregation seemed to have removed the hassle to remain a bit reserved as they were not bothered in thier segregated existance.
    I was told so many stories that Saudi’s are cruel kidnappers etc……so untrue.
    There might be exceptions like the one’s in India who try to prey on foriegners due to their vulnerability but if you are a bit careful such incidents IF ANY could be avoided.
    In Dammam I met my friend’s sister who works as a teacher who is living here since last 18 years and she did not have a single complaint about anything in the Kingdom, she only had expressed satisfaction for the quality of life she got here which despite having same financial stability in India will remain elusive.
    So this is to announce again ‘NO WORRIES.
    Further as quoted by you in Dear bedu – you were very much right when you stated that’ even in Paradise a man can still remain unsatisfied’.’

  34. Thank you for sharing your experience of traveling by train in Saudi!

  35. I might also add that the train journey between Rihadh and Damman is very pleasant and and problem-free. The staff were good, fellow travellers pleasant and helpful, children mostly well behaved. We were surprised by the number of women travelling but then I think people from the east travel to Rihadh for shopping – very major shopping from what we saw on the return trip to Dammam.

  36. TO: the comment from CRAIG and DONNA. hope you two find the stats helpful and don’t deny them too :)
    btw, i myself live and grew up in America and i love this place. I just visited Saudi Arabia, and your comments about crime there were wrong, there IS less crime. so i just wanted to let you two know that by stats :)

    SAUDI ARABIA CRIME STATS IN 21st CENTURY

    Burglaries : 14
    Source: The Eighth United Nations Survey on Crime Trends and the Operations of Criminal Justice Systems (2002) (United Nations Office on Drugs and Crime, Centre for International Crime Prevention)

    Rapes: 59
    Source: International Centre for Prison Studies – World Prison Brief

    Murders: 202
    Source: The Eighth United Nations Survey on Crime Trends and the Operations of Criminal Justice Systems (2002) (United Nations Office on Drugs and Crime, Centre for International Crime Prevention)

    —————————————————————–
    UNITED STATES OF AMERICA CRIME STATS IN 21st CENTURY

    Car thefts: 1,246,096
    Source: UNICRI (United Nations Interregional Crime and Justice Research Institute). 2002. Correspondence on data on crime victims. March. Turin

    Rapes: 95,136
    Source: UNICRI (United Nations Interregional Crime and Justice Research Institute). 2002. Correspondence on data on crime victims. March. Turin

    Murders: 16,204
    Source: All CIA World Factbooks 18 December 2003 to 18 December 2008

  37. Those stats area very wrong. The crimes are much, much higher than that. Burglaries happen every day. In my own family between July and November last year there were 3 burglaries and this was in one small town on the east coast. Rapes go unreported so who knows how many rapes there are.
    There might be less crime – who knows? What I do know that your facts are fiction.

  38. Can’t we all get alone some of you people are getting a little crazy this is carols blog and its about how she felt in saudi and dont get me wrong i was also wondering but give it a shot you never know until you try the crime is much lower because if a saudi does something really bad esp to an america they will be killed dont you think if usa have these stander that it would be safe but no usa think you put a rapist in jail for 5 years and then he stops >>>>>>>>>>>>.. NOPE does it again! my husband is saudi and i love the way they think :) <3

  39. Karla:

    I prefer to have my freedom for my family to include the women folk. What you don’t see is the hidden atrocities of crime that cannot be spoken as it is against culture/man made delusion religions or the illusion of family honor to the detriment of the victim and the oppression of those who are not saudi males.

  40. To NK:

    What’s the point of providing all that data for two countries with a totally different population? When did 30 million become close to 300 million? From the statistical point of view, this is a pointless job.

    What an absurd.

  41. I think in some circumstances the word safe has different meaning. Yes women are raped all over the world, they are harrassed and oppressed and generally made to feel like the lesser gender…however, there is a difference when it comes to freedom to move about, freedom to behave a certain way, dress a certain way, hang out with certain people etc and not have t o worry about the consequences…which in some countries can be dire, even fatal. Let us say that over all Saudi is safer (just an example)…but if a woman steps out of her gender/cultural box and does anything to cause issues for herr family, here culture, or her religion…than is she safer at that time as a female in saudi then in the states? I think in some regards this is what people are referring to when they speak of being safe. Women are NOT safe in Saudi…because at any moment some man (father, brother, stranger, hayaa etc) can decide she is over stepping her place as a female in that country and then what can she do about what happens next? Not a whole lot. She has no power, no voice, no rights…and that is about as unsafe as you can get.

  42. Very good points coolred!
    Women or girls are not safe at all in SA, anything can happen to them when the wrong man has property rights over them.
    Any woman who does not fit the box is by definition in serious danger.
    Up to dying from mysterious diseases or coma’s. Or disappearing.

  43. Can a woman walk in the street without being harassed?
    No
    Can a woman walk in her own street without being harassed?
    No.
    Can a woman walk in a nice expensive street without being harassed?
    No.
    They have to shut the malls to man to keep women safe from men. How can this be considered a safe country?
    Remember, one of the reasons women cannot be allowed to drive cars in Saudi Arabia is because, according to the imams, a woman who has a mishap with her car will immediately get raped.
    Oh i am sorry, that should have read: ”will immediately be seducing innocent men into raping her”.

    Saudi Arabia cannot be considered safe. At least not for women. Who are really human, actually 50% of humanity is female.

    A country cannot be called ”safe” if the weakest part of the population is not protected.

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